Cherokee-Nation-News Newsen-usSat, 23 Feb 2019 17:53:59 CSTSat, 23 Feb 2019 17:53:59 CSThttp://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rssNativeKnot.comNational Native Organizations Respond to Reply Briefs in Brackeen v. Bernhardthttps://www.nativeknot.com/news/Cherokee-Nation-News/National-Native-Organizations-Respond-to-Reply-Briefs-in-Brackee.html<p><strong>PORTLAND, Ore.</strong><span> — In reply briefs filed Tuesday with the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in the case </span><em>Brackeen v. Bernhardt</em><span>, the United States and defendant tribal nations reaffirm the constitutionality of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA). The briefs also underscore why ICWA’s protections continue to be vital for Native children and families.</span></p><br /> <p><span>For over 40 years, ICWA has acknowledged the inherent right of tribal governments and the critical role they play to protect their member children and maintain the stability of families.</span></p><br /> <p><em>Brackeen v. Bernhardt </em>is the lawsuit brought by Texas, Indiana, Louisiana, and individual plaintiffs, who allege ICWA—a federal statute that has been in effect for more than 40 years and has helped thousands of Native children maintain ties to their families and their tribes—is unconstitutional. It is the first time that a state has sued the federal government over ICWA’s constitutionality. The lawsuit names various federal agencies and officials as defendants and five tribal nations (Cherokee Nation, Morongo Band of Mission Indians, Navajo Nation, Oneida Nation, and Quinault Indian Nation) also have intervened as defendants. In addition, amicus briefs in support of ICWA were filed on behalf of 325 tribal nations, 21 states, several members of Congress, and dozens of Native organizations, child welfare organizations, and other allies.</p><br /> <p><strong>ICWA is constitutional.</strong></p><br /> <p>The U.S. Constitution specifically gives Congress the power to legislate for the benefit of Native people and tribal nations. ICWA falls within that constitutional authority because it applies only to children who are either citizens (referred to as “members” in ICWA) of a federally recognized tribe or who are both eligible for citizenship and the biological child of a tribal citizen parent. In addition, Congress has enacted laws concerning Native children from the earliest days of the United States government. ICWA provides a productive framework for states and tribal nations to partner in protecting the health and well-being of Native children.</p><br /> <p><strong>ICWA ensures that Native children and families receive the services they deserve.</strong></p><br /> <p>There is a long history of Native children being removed from their families and communities without sufficient reason and often with little consideration of the rights of either the Native children or their families. Before ICWA was enacted in 1978, as many as one out of every three Native children was removed from their home. ICWA has helped to reduce these alarming removal rates and helped more Native families stay together. Child welfare research clearly shows that children are best served by preserving connections with their birth family and community. Child welfare experts across the country are working together with tribes, states, and allies to continue implementing and protecting ICWA as the “gold standard” in child welfare law and ensuring Native children and families receive the services they deserve.</p><br /> <p>Striking down ICWA would not only be wrong as a matter of law; it also would have devastating real-world effects by harming Native children and undermining the ability of child welfare agencies and courts to serve their best interest.</p><br /> <p>Evidence shows that ICWA’s framework achieves better outcomes for children. National Native organizations stand with tribal nations and non-tribal ICWA allies to take action to protect ICWA and end the unnecessary removal of Native children from their families, tribes, and communities.</p><br /> <p>A copy of the reply brief of the Federal Defendants can be found <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.nicwa.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/2019.02.19-2-USA-Reply-Br.pdf" target="_blank" data-auth="NotApplicable">here, </a>a copy of the reply brief of the Intervening Tribes (Cherokee/Morongo/Oneida/Quinault) can be found <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.nicwa.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/2019.02.19-1-Tribes-Reply-Br.pdf" target="_blank" data-auth="NotApplicable">here, </a>a copy of the reply brief of the Navajo Nation can be found <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.nicwa.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/2019.02.19-3-Navajo-Reply-Br.pdf" target="_blank" data-auth="NotApplicable">here.</a></p>Fri, 22 Feb 2019 0:00:00 CST“Osiyo, Voices of the Cherokee People” Is Showing at Major Film Festivals https://www.nativeknot.com/news/Cherokee-Nation-News/Osiyo-Voices-of-the-Cherokee-People-Is-Showing-at-Major-Film-Fes.html<p style="text-align: center;"><strong><em>Cherokee Nation sharing citizens’ stories through film</em></strong></p><br /> <p style="text-align: left;"> </p><br /> <p><strong>TAHLEQUAH, Okla.</strong><span> </span>— The producers of Cherokee Nation’s Emmy award-winning documentary series, “Osiyo, Voices of the Cherokee People,” have been selected to screen their short films at several major film festivals in 2019.</p><br /> <p>What began as a monthly, 30-minute news magazine-style program in February 2015 has morphed into a weekly show and reshaped the way the tribe shares about its history, language, culture, and people. Now Cherokee Nation is sharing those stories as individual short documentaries, competing in film festivals across the globe.</p><br /> <p>The series and the short documentaries within it has earned numerous regional, national and international accolades, including five Heartland Regional Emmy awards and most recently Best Short Documentary at the LA Skins Fest, which featured more than 70 Native American, independent productions representing hundreds of reservations, nations, and tribal organizations.</p><br /> <p>“We have been overwhelmed by the amount of truly amazing stories there are to tell on behalf of the Cherokee people,” said Jennifer Loren, executive producer, and host. “Expanding these stories into their own documentaries gave us the time and space to let each feature truly unfold. We are so thankful for the opportunity to share these stories and feel honored to be entrusted with doing so by the tribe and our fellow Cherokee.”</p><br /> <p><strong>Upcoming festivals and short documentaries selected include:</strong></p><br /> <p><strong>Feb. 23</strong><span> </span>– March 3: 25th Annual Sedona International Film Festival in Sedona, Arizona, featuring “<em>Speaking Through Generations” </em>(Betty Frogg).</p><br /> <p><strong>Feb. 27</strong><span> </span>– March 3: Durango Independent Film Festival in Durango, Colorado, featuring “<em>Speaking Through Generations” </em>(Betty Frogg), “<em>Chasing 14,000″ </em>(Hannah Jordan), and “<em>The Man They Call Fuel” (Brad Eubanks)</em>. “<em>Chasing 14,000″ </em>has also been accepted into Durango’s REEL Learning program, which brings a curated selection of films into local schools.</p><br /> <p><strong>March 20-24</strong>: Maoriland Film Festival in Otaki, New Zealand, featuring “<em>The Man They Call Fuel” </em>(Brad Eubanks)<em>.</em></p><br /> <p>March 29 – April 4: American Documentary Film Festival in Palm Springs, California, featuring “<em>Crosslin Smith, The Old Ways.”</em></p><br /> <p><strong>April 10-14</strong>: Thin Line Film Festival in Denton, Texas, featuring “<em>Mason Fine: Chasing History</em>.” This will be the theatrical World Premiere.</p><br /> <p>OsiyoTV is available statewide on PBS in Oklahoma and Arkansas, regionally within Tulsa on RSU-TV, in Joplin on NBC and ABC as well as FNX, an all-Native programming network in 20 national markets. The show is formatted for multiple platforms including <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="http://icm-tracking.meltwater.com/link.php?DynEngagement=true&H=btYXC68syxmDVppbhVzFoYHdeMNV9070xvOlf%2FNdDQ0wXj6aidRhmxmXkuXFeTMLGXzIhQB17ndllVpOUzKkPSk0TlNX98JldVHD60%2Fdl8cG9rCq1tt3H2GcXGyYz6JA&G=0&R=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.osiyo.tv&I=20190219171456.0000005dafe3%40mail6-114-ussnn1&X=MHwxMDQ2NzU4OjVjNmIxMjNlMzRiZjU1NTA3Y2I5MDJjYzs%3D&S=B3rJ-NuDCbbIh3Z3rJgvr9G8jsZ1aVzws1RtzOpZaJk" target="_blank" data-auth="NotApplicable">www.osiyo.tv</a>, <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="http://icm-tracking.meltwater.com/link.php?DynEngagement=true&H=btYXC68syxmDVppbhVzFoYHdeMNV9070xvOlf%2FNdDQ0wXj6aidRhmxmXkuXFeTMLGXzIhQB17ndllVpOUzKkPSk0TlNX98JldVHD60%2Fdl8cG9rCq1tt3H2GcXGyYz6JA&G=0&R=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fchannel%2FUCZClGXX2Xi8uOraErUVnIZA&I=20190219171456.0000005dafe3%40mail6-114-ussnn1&X=MHwxMDQ2NzU4OjVjNmIxMjNlMzRiZjU1NTA3Y2I5MDJjYzs%3D&S=ynSbcR_QR9S1w_p9UxGXQt_VLY1PAYgJlsyvX0a84SU" target="_blank" data-auth="NotApplicable">YouTube</a>, <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="http://icm-tracking.meltwater.com/link.php?DynEngagement=true&H=btYXC68syxmDVppbhVzFoYHdeMNV9070xvOlf%2FNdDQ0wXj6aidRhmxmXkuXFeTMLGXzIhQB17ndllVpOUzKkPSk0TlNX98JldVHD60%2Fdl8cG9rCq1tt3H2GcXGyYz6JA&G=0&R=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fchannel%2FUCZClGXX2Xi8uOraErUVnIZA&I=20190219171456.0000005dafe3%40mail6-114-ussnn1&X=MHwxMDQ2NzU4OjVjNmIxMjNlMzRiZjU1NTA3Y2I5MDJjYzs%3D&S=ynSbcR_QR9S1w_p9UxGXQt_VLY1PAYgJlsyvX0a84SU" target="_blank" data-auth="NotApplicable">Vimeo</a>, <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="http://icm-tracking.meltwater.com/link.php?DynEngagement=true&H=btYXC68syxmDVppbhVzFoYHdeMNV9070xvOlf%2FNdDQ0wXj6aidRhmxmXkuXFeTMLGXzIhQB17ndllVpOUzKkPSk0TlNX98JldVHD60%2Fdl8cG9rCq1tt3H2GcXGyYz6JA&G=0&R=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fosiyotv%2F&I=20190219171456.0000005dafe3%40mail6-114-ussnn1&X=MHwxMDQ2NzU4OjVjNmIxMjNlMzRiZjU1NTA3Y2I5MDJjYzs%3D&S=FCAzvgzC4XNt58E319uwB4Q-nqV9P_2-ChbP9rwRzz4" target="_blank" data-auth="NotApplicable">Facebook</a>, <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="http://icm-tracking.meltwater.com/link.php?DynEngagement=true&H=btYXC68syxmDVppbhVzFoYHdeMNV9070xvOlf%2FNdDQ0wXj6aidRhmxmXkuXFeTMLGXzIhQB17ndllVpOUzKkPSk0TlNX98JldVHD60%2Fdl8cG9rCq1tt3H2GcXGyYz6JA&G=0&R=https%3A%2F%2Ftwitter.com%2Fosiyo_tv&I=20190219171456.0000005dafe3%40mail6-114-ussnn1&X=MHwxMDQ2NzU4OjVjNmIxMjNlMzRiZjU1NTA3Y2I5MDJjYzs%3D&S=80hs7E5FSwe7WWqyeGo-K4qajq0QXRplHVByayXSxQU" target="_blank" data-auth="NotApplicable">Twitter</a> and more. It is funded and produced by Cherokee Nation Businesses.</p><br /> <p>For more information and to watch “Osiyo, Voices of the Cherokee People,” please visit <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="http://icm-tracking.meltwater.com/link.php?DynEngagement=true&H=btYXC68syxmDVppbhVzFoYHdeMNV9070xvOlf%2FNdDQ0wXj6aidRhmxmXkuXFeTMLGXzIhQB17ndllVpOUzKkPSk0TlNX98JldVHD60%2Fdl8cG9rCq1tt3H2GcXGyYz6JA&G=0&R=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.osiyo.tv&I=20190219171456.0000005dafe3%40mail6-114-ussnn1&X=MHwxMDQ2NzU4OjVjNmIxMjNlMzRiZjU1NTA3Y2I5MDJjYzs%3D&S=B3rJ-NuDCbbIh3Z3rJgvr9G8jsZ1aVzws1RtzOpZaJk" target="_blank" data-auth="NotApplicable">www.osiyo.tv</a>.</p>Thu, 21 Feb 2019 0:00:00 CSTCherokee Nation Receives $281,000 Grant to Add Five New Transit Vanshttps://www.nativeknot.com/news/Cherokee-Nation-News/Cherokee-Nation-Receives-281000-Grant-to-Add-Five-New-Transit-Va.html<p style="text-align: center;"><strong><em>Funding will also expand low-cost curb-to-curb response service in Tahlequah, Pryor</em><em> </em></strong></p><br /> <p style="text-align: left;"> </p><br /> <p><strong>TAHLEQUAH</strong><span> </span>— The Cherokee Nation is receiving a $281,250 grant from the Federal Transit Administration for five new transit vehicles that will replace older vans and expand services in Tahlequah and Pryor.</p><br /> <p>Cherokee Nation’s Department of Transportation program is one of only three tribal programs in Oklahoma and one of 36 total projects in 14 states to receive one of the FTA’s Tribal Transit Program grants. Tribal Transit Program funds help tribes like the Cherokee Nation connect citizens to jobs, health care, school, and other necessary services.</p><br /> <p>Cherokee Nation will replace three older transit vans, which currently provide employment-based commuter routes from Salina to Catoosa, Sallisaw to Tahlequah and Tahlequah to Catoosa. The tribe will also expand its demand response, known as curb-to-curb service, in Tahlequah and Pryor with two more new transit vans. The five new vans are expected to be delivered by the fall of 2019.</p><br /> <p>“Providing safe, reliable transportation options have allowed the Cherokee Nation to help our citizens connect to quality jobs, education, vital medical appointments and many other services that improve their lives,” said Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden. “It’s a blessing to know we are now able to upgrade our transit fleet and provide expanded services in areas where they are most needed.”</p><br /> <p>Cherokee Nation contracts with Ki Bois Area Transit System, Pelivan Transit, Muskogee County Transit, and Cimarron Public Transit to provide low-cost transportation throughout the tribe’s northeastern Oklahoma jurisdiction. Native Americans and tribal employees can access rides on fixed routes and on-demand service transit buses for $1 round trip. In the fiscal year 2018, the Cherokee Nation’s transit services provided 107,712 rides, an increase of more than 5,500 rides compared to FY 2017.</p><br /> <p>Commuter routes are open to the public for those who need transportation to specified locations within established timeframes. Demand-response routes are open to the public for individuals who are unable to use commuter routes and who do not qualify for Sooner Ride or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families. Destinations for these curb-to-curb service routes include places of employment, governmental facilities, health care facilities, financial institutions, and grocery stores nearest to the pickup location.</p><br /> <p>“Partnerships with agencies like the Federal Transit Administration are a win-win for the Cherokee Nation and our citizens,” said Michael Lynn, director of Cherokee Nation’s Department of Transportation. “We appreciate this grant opportunity and look forward to getting our five new transit vans online and serving our communities throughout the Cherokee Nation later this year.”</p><br /> <p>Tribal Transit Program grants are competitive. This year, 50 proposed projects from 47 tribes in 16 states were considered for a federal grant. The Federal Transit Administration ultimately awarded a total of $5 million in funding to 36 projects.</p><br /> <p>“The Federal Transit Administration is committed to helping tribal residents with their transportation needs,” FTA Acting Administrator K. Jane Williams said in a press release. “We’re proud to support investments in their transit systems, which provide access to essential services.”</p><br /> <p>In 2018, the Cherokee Nation used an FTA grant worth more than $321,500 to provide six new transit vans to the four transit service companies that contract with the tribe.</p><br /> <p>To learn more about Cherokee Nation transit routes, schedules, and fares, log on to <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="http://icm-tracking.meltwater.com/link.php?DynEngagement=true&H=5eXH0qSKdBRphS6WO4YlQwwSTi8wtQOqejFjZKiddbCzZ5Bbl4XDYfJM1IGNwXOiXxtcHXTPabnS2eGHs%2FkS3SLBo%2F7kzWFXCce7jzALuFQiOFzvWaJjFshcAXRZs6HL&G=0&R=https%3A%2F%2Ftransit.cherokee.org&I=20190218215420.000000b64f72%40mail6-43-usnbn1&X=MHwxMDQ2NzU4OjVjNmIyOTdkNmM2NWVlMGExYmM0OGE4Zjs%3D&S=VMH10j1WpyV7BO_TmiI7G-kxMV22EBFoFx6KxrX62JA" data-auth="NotApplicable">https://transit.cherokee.org</a>.</p>Wed, 20 Feb 2019 0:00:00 CSTFREE ACT PREP BOOT CAMP AVAILABLE FOR NATIVE AMERICAN STUDENTShttps://www.nativeknot.com/news/Cherokee-Nation-News/FREE-ACT-PREP-BOOT-CAMP-AVAILABLE-FOR-NATIVE-AMERICAN-STUDENTS.html<p style="text-align: center;"><strong><em>Applications accepted through March 15</em></strong></p><br /> <p style="text-align: left;"> </p><br /> <p><strong>TAHLEQUAH, Okla.</strong><span> </span>— Cherokee Nation Foundation is offering a free ACT Boot Camp on Saturday, March 30. The one-day course will be held at the Sequoyah High School Gym in Tahlequah from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.</p><br /> <p>“We encourage all students to be proactive in planning for their academic future, and preparing for the ACT is a vital step in that process,” said Janice Randall, executive director for Cherokee Nation Foundation. “We have a wide variety of ACT prep programs, and by diversifying how we deliver the content, we hope to reach more students and help them achieve their highest score possible. The boot camp is a great way for students to learn more about the test and themselves.”</p><br /> <p>ACT Boot Camp is led by Mastery-Prep, an organization dedicated to building students’ confidence on test day by providing essential test-taking strategies and skills. Instructors will guide students through content strategies for all four subjects on the ACT and administer mini-tests to help students identify their strengths and weaknesses.</p><br /> <p>The course is offered to Native American students in grades 10-12, with preference given to Cherokee Nation students.</p><br /> <p><span>The deadline to register is March 15. Students interested in the course can call the foundation at 918-207-0950 or apply online at </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="http://icm-tracking.meltwater.com/link.php?DynEngagement=true&H=oGJ1pkZyysOST8btnWeAdWfazdP60O3PLkuOZioW2RiI0IVhceklygjBfNPuV9gydu0rVCHfVdipSbf4qnAkfGS665rER9KvStV5fvITmqwnjdlVqMK0UCXpyuccBGlk&G=0&R=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cherokeenationfoundation.org&I=20180827162142.0000000d01ae%40mail6-94-usnbn1&X=MHwxMDQ2NzU4OjViODQxZjc3Njc3Nzc4NzhjZjE3MTA4YTs%3D&S=uKAgyUAnn_Xx3cFWjvaAsqzOm240n9XH8txCJzi7jgI" target="_blank" data-auth="NotApplicable">www.cherokeenationfoundation.org</a><span>.</span></p>Wed, 13 Feb 2019 0:00:00 CSTCN Businesses Subsidiaries Announce Projects With Federal Departmentshttps://www.nativeknot.com/news/Cherokee-Nation-News/Cherokee-Nation-Businesses-Subsidiaries-Announce-Projects-With-F.html<p>Cherokee Services Group and Cherokee Nation System Solutions, both subsidiaries of Cherokee Nation Businesses, recently announced agreements to assist the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of the Interior, respectively.</p><br /> <p>Cherokee Services Group (CSG) will assist with the design and implementation of digital services for the United States Department of Agriculture. CSG will particularly address the agency’s Identity, Credential, and Access Management (ICAM) Program.</p><br /> <p>A subsidiary of Cherokee Nation Businesses, CSB is providing software design, development, and related services to help modernize the program’s web interfaces. The Tribally-owned company also performs quality assurance testing and agile project management to deliver an updated and production-ready version of the USDA’s eAuthentication Service, enterprise-wide web authentication and single sign-on platform.</p><br /> <p>The work is being performed in Fort Collins, Colorado, where CSG’s regional office is located.</p><br /> <p>The United States Department of Agriculture’s Identity, Credential, and Access Management Program provides oversight and coordinates efforts to implement the processes, policies, and technology necessary to deliver digital services to the department’s agencies and staff offices.</p><br /> <p>For more than a decade, Cherokee Services Group has provided federal and commercial clients with award-winning IT solutions and business support services. Wholly owned by the Cherokee Nation, CSG specializes in software and application services, network infrastructure services and business process services. Headquartered in Tulsa, Cherokee Services Group has 23 additional offices nationwide.</p><br /> <p><strong>Cherokee Nation System Solutions to Support Trust Beneficiary Call Center</strong></p><br /> <p>Cherokee Nation System Solutions is partnering with the Department of Interior through a contract with its Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians. CNSS is working to improve the day-to-day operations at the agency’s Trust Beneficiary Call Center.</p><br /> <p>CNSS, a subsidiary of Cherokee Nation Businesses, is providing a wide range of automated and manual customer support services to respond to incoming inquiries and requests. The tribally owned company is helping improve TBCC’s range of services by focusing on efficiency, accuracy, employee engagement, management approaches, and industry best practices.</p><br /> <p>“Since 2004, TBCC has served a unique and integral role in OST Field Operations by providing responsive, accurate and timely information regarding trust assets, account updates, and disbursements,” said James McMurry, project manager for Cherokee Nation System Solutions. “We are proud to join this endeavor and the DOI’s ongoing mission to support American Indian Trust beneficiaries.”</p><br /> <p>The Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians’ Trust Beneficiary Call Center is a nationwide, toll-free call center that enables individual Native Americans to obtain information regarding their trust assets, request account information updates, or request a disbursement from their Individual Indian Money account.</p><br /> <p><span>Cherokee Nation System Solutions provides a complete line of innovative services, consulting and products to government agencies, including application modernization, data utilization, and advanced analytics, geospatial, GIS and remote sensing, information technology infrastructure, program professional services, and scientific and research capabilities. CNSS offers an extensive selection of quality services and products at competitive prices. The CNSS team collaborates with partners nationwide to provide even the most complex services to clients.</span></p>Wed, 13 Feb 2019 0:00:00 CST4 Tribes Respond to False Briefs Filed in Court of Appeals Opposing the ICW Acthttps://www.nativeknot.com/news/Cherokee-Nation-News/Four-Tribes-Respond-to-False-Briefs-Filed-in-Court-of-Appeals-Op.html<p><strong>NEW ORLEANS</strong> — Four tribal leaders issued a statement on Wednesday to denounce the filing in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit by</p><br /> <p>Signing on the joint statement were: Principal Chief Bill John Baker, Cherokee Nation; Chairman Robert Martin, Morongo Band of Mission Indians; Chairman Tehassi Hill, Oneida Nation; and President Fawn Sharp, Quinault Indian Nation.</p><br /> <p><strong>Joint</strong><span> </span><strong>Tribal Statement Responding to Briefs Filed in Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals Opposing the Indian Child Welfare Act</strong></p><br /> <p>We are dismayed that opponents of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) and tribal sovereignty continued to perpetuate damaging falsehoods in briefs filed this week with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit regarding tribal citizenship and the care that Native children receive under the ICWA’s landmark protections.</p><br /> <p>Passed more than 40 years ago by Congress, ICWA was designed to reverse decades of cultural insensitivity and political bias that had resulted in up to a third of all Indian children being forcibly removed from their families, their tribes and their cultural heritage.</p><br /> <p>ICWA ensures the best interests and wellbeing of Native American children are protected. ICWA preserves the stability and cohesion of Tribal families, Tribal communities and Tribal cultures. As federally-recognized sovereign nations, we have the duty, the responsibility, and the wisdom to protect our children.</p><br /> <p>The flawed arguments by the plaintiffs and their allies have been rejected time and again by state and federal courts over the past 40 years. ICWA is not based on race but on the political relationships of individual Native Americans with federally-recognized tribes. The district court’s flawed decision potentially upsets a foundational precept of federal Indian law—that the relationship between tribes and tribal citizens is a political one.</p><br /> <p>Most importantly, opponents disregard decades of evidence and case law that show ICWA’s provisions are demonstrably in the best interests of the child. Accepted best practices among child welfare experts – including those in Texas – call for keeping a child with his or her family or relatives whenever possible. ICWA does just that. That is why ICWA is regarded as the gold standard for child welfare and is so strongly supported by preeminent organizations such as the National CASA Association, the National Association of Social Workers, Casey Family Programs and the Annie E. Casey Foundation.</p><br /> <p>We stand with the bipartisan coalition of federal lawmakers, attorneys general from 21 states, and 30 child welfare organizations who have joined 325 Tribal governments and 57 Tribal organizations in filing numerous amicus briefs urging the Fifth Circuit to overturn the district court’s disastrous ruling</p><br /> <p>We remain committed to protecting the Constitutionality of ICWA for Native children, families, and Tribes. We firmly believe that our rights, and our children’s rights, will be affirmed and reinforced.</p>Fri, 08 Feb 2019 0:00:00 CSTCN Cultural Tourism Expands Moccasin-making Classes to Include Beadworkhttps://www.nativeknot.com/news/Cherokee-Nation-News/Cherokee-Nation-Cultural-Tourism-Expands-Moccasinmaking-Classes-.html<p style="text-align: center;"><strong><em>Registration now available for 2019 classes at Cherokee National Prison Museum</em></strong></p><br /> <p style="text-align: left;"> </p><br /> <div><br /> <p><strong>TAHLEQUAH, Okla.<span> </span></strong>— Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism is hosting a series of cultural classes to learn the art of making traditional pucker-toe moccasins.</p><br /> <p>The Saturday workshops are scheduled for March 9, July 13 and Nov. 9 at the Cherokee National Prison Museum from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Registration costs $35.</p><br /> <p>In addition to the traditional classes, the program will also offer classes on how to add beadwork to traditional pucker-toe moccasins using two-needle applique. Guests will learn how to add beadwork to the toe and how to edge the flaps. The classes are offered May 4 and Oct. 5 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Registration costs $45.</p><br /> <p>Early registration is recommended and available online at <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="http://icm-tracking.meltwater.com/link.php?DynEngagement=true&H=btYXC68syxnIlVIaW0qBweEUHWPFwuN5EgnqFgPj0oiC1OMl9zi1RqsfCW0s0q8SDVr6f8R0dEjZmlyf4a0JgwoDNcCmnvz0TaIlq4krhItoafxRtz2B0bvZoRtIXYLZ&G=0&R=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.cherokeegiftshop.com%2F&I=20190205153745.00000009a2ec%40mail6-113-ussnn1&X=MHwxMDQ2NzU4OjVjNTlhOTJkMzRiZjU1NTA3Y2I4ZWU2OTs%3D&S=ak57vzmfz9_DL7JQrNlzDv648Y4vK2Xtjk1kXz87ndw" target="_blank" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=http://icm-tracking.meltwater.com/link.php?DynEngagement%3Dtrue%26H%3DbtYXC68syxnIlVIaW0qBweEUHWPFwuN5EgnqFgPj0oiC1OMl9zi1RqsfCW0s0q8SDVr6f8R0dEjZmlyf4a0JgwoDNcCmnvz0TaIlq4krhItoafxRtz2B0bvZoRtIXYLZ%26G%3D0%26R%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.cherokeegiftshop.com%252F%26I%3D20190205153745.00000009a2ec%2540mail6-113-ussnn1%26X%3DMHwxMDQ2NzU4OjVjNTlhOTJkMzRiZjU1NTA3Y2I4ZWU2OTs%253D%26S%3Dak57vzmfz9_DL7JQrNlzDv648Y4vK2Xtjk1kXz87ndw&source=gmail&ust=1549640973763000&usg=AFQjCNHj3rjaH_QSHCXGAeR4mVSJXV6xVA">www.cherokeegiftshop.com</a>. Class size is limited to 15 people on a first-come, first served basis. All materials are provided, and participants are asked to bring their own lunch.</p><br /> <p>The Cherokee National Prison Museum is located at 124 E. Choctaw St.</p><br /> <p>For information on Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism, including museum operations, please call (877) 779-6977 or visit <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="http://icm-tracking.meltwater.com/link.php?DynEngagement=true&H=btYXC68syxnIlVIaW0qBweEUHWPFwuN5EgnqFgPj0oiC1OMl9zi1RqsfCW0s0q8SDVr6f8R0dEjZmlyf4a0JgwoDNcCmnvz0TaIlq4krhItoafxRtz2B0bvZoRtIXYLZ&G=0&R=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.visitcherokeenation.com%2F&I=20190205153745.00000009a2ec%40mail6-113-ussnn1&X=MHwxMDQ2NzU4OjVjNTlhOTJkMzRiZjU1NTA3Y2I4ZWU2OTs%3D&S=DXr8ylsVI9vWGrMwQ3P44rFIpggonJys8Xjxyd8lmyg" target="_blank" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=http://icm-tracking.meltwater.com/link.php?DynEngagement%3Dtrue%26H%3DbtYXC68syxnIlVIaW0qBweEUHWPFwuN5EgnqFgPj0oiC1OMl9zi1RqsfCW0s0q8SDVr6f8R0dEjZmlyf4a0JgwoDNcCmnvz0TaIlq4krhItoafxRtz2B0bvZoRtIXYLZ%26G%3D0%26R%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.visitcherokeenation.com%252F%26I%3D20190205153745.00000009a2ec%2540mail6-113-ussnn1%26X%3DMHwxMDQ2NzU4OjVjNTlhOTJkMzRiZjU1NTA3Y2I4ZWU2OTs%253D%26S%3DDXr8ylsVI9vWGrMwQ3P44rFIpggonJys8Xjxyd8lmyg&source=gmail&ust=1549640973764000&usg=AFQjCNE1SXBY-1BmmquwJr5QTVJdlkv3WQ">www.VisitCherokeeNation.com</a>.</p><br /> </div>Thu, 07 Feb 2019 0:00:00 CSTCN System Solutions Partnering with DI to Help Serve Native Americanshttps://www.nativeknot.com/news/Cherokee-Nation-News/CN-System-Solutions-Partnering-with-Department-of-Interior-to-He.html<p align="center"><strong><em>Tribally owned company supporting Trust Beneficiary Call Center</em></strong></p><br /> <p><strong>TULSA, Okla.</strong><span> — Cherokee Nation System Solutions is partnering with the Department of Interior through a contract with its Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians. CNSS is working to improve the day-to-day operations at the agency’s Trust Beneficiary Call Center.</span></p><br /> <p>CNSS, a subsidiary of Cherokee Nation Businesses, is providing a wide range of automated and manual customer support services to respond to incoming inquiries and requests. The tribally owned company is helping improve TBCC’s range of services by focusing on efficiency, accuracy, employee engagement, management approaches, and industry best practices.</p><br /> <p>“Since 2004, TBCC has served a unique and integral role in OST Field Operations by providing responsive, accurate and timely information regarding trust assets, account updates, and disbursements,” said James McMurry, project manager for Cherokee Nation System Solutions. “We are proud to join this endeavor and the DOI’s ongoing mission to support American Indian Trust beneficiaries.”</p><br /> <p>The Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians’ Trust Beneficiary Call Center is a nationwide, toll-free call center that enables individual Native Americans to obtain information regarding their trust assets, request account information updates, or request a disbursement from their Individual Indian Money account.</p><br /> <p>Cherokee Nation System Solutions provides a complete line of innovative services, consulting and products to government agencies, including application modernization, data utilization, and advanced analytics, geospatial, GIS and remote sensing, information technology infrastructure, program professional services, and scientific and research capabilities. CNSS offers an extensive selection of quality services and products at competitive prices. The CNSS team collaborates with partners nationwide to provide even the most complex services to clients.</p>Wed, 06 Feb 2019 0:00:00 CSTNew CN Film Office Puts Tribe on Map as Destination for Film & Music Makershttps://www.nativeknot.com/news/Cherokee-Nation-News/New-Cherokee-Nation-Film-Office-Puts-Tribe-on-Map-as-Destination.html<p><span>The people, places, history and culture of the Cherokee Nation could soon be featured on the big screen with the launch of the Cherokee Nation Film Office. The Cherokee Nation Film Office’s mission is to grow the state’s film industry by promoting northeast Oklahoma as a destination for filmmakers, maintaining a database of Cherokee Nation locations, resources and talent, serving as a cultural and historical consultant on film projects, and perhaps most importantly, creating an environment that cultivates Native filmmaking.</span></p><br /> <p><strong><span>“Five years ago, we launched the production of ‘Osiyo, Voices of the Cherokee People.’ It was the first Native American programming of its kind, and we’re proud that it was created by Cherokee Nation citizens. The show has been wildly successful, winning five Emmy Awards. Through the show, we discovered there are many Cherokees with a natural talent for filmmaking,” said Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. “As secretary of state, I regularly interact with individuals who fundamentally misunderstand Native Americans. What I’ve learned is Native stories are best told by Native voices, and we hope to develop local talent that will tell those stories. We have extremely talented filmmakers, producers, directors and actors in the Cherokee Nation. My vision is to create an environment that nurtures our talented Cherokees in this space and ensures that Native stories are told accurately and with authenticity. I was pleased that when I asked Amanda to lead the effort to create the Cherokee Nation Film Office, she immediately said yes.”</span></strong></p><br /> <p><span>The Cherokee Nation Film Office is a new division under Cherokee Nation Businesses’ communications department and will be led by CNB Vice President of Communications Amanda Clinton, with heavy support from other tribal departments. The office will work with the Oklahoma Film + Music Office (OF+MO), the Tulsa Office of Film, Music, Arts, and Culture (Tulsa FMAC) and other local film offices to leverage resources and talent. Areas of cooperation include providing local recommendations for crew and talent, coordinating site visits, hosting filmmaking workshops, film festivals and more. The department also produces a docuseries, “Osiyo, Voices of the Cherokee People” which features Cherokee people, history and culture, told through short documentaries.</span></p><br /> <p><strong>“Before we created ‘Osiyo, Voices of the Cherokee People,’ I had no idea the depth of Native talent that existed in this industry but was being under-utilized or not utilized at all,” Clinton said. “But in addition to the talent pool we have in the Cherokee Nation, it’s also one of the most beautiful areas of our state. Promoting a place so close to our hearts as a filmmaking destination is a mission we’re excited to fulfill.”</strong></p><br /> <p> </p><br /> <p>The series has produced more than 160 short documentaries since production began in 2015. The show airs statewide in Oklahoma and Arkansas and online at osiyo.tv.</p><br /> <p>“With the success of our show, and with other film projects on the horizon, we feel like we are really making a mark in the documentary film industry,” said Jennifer Loren, host and executive producer of Osiyo, Voices of the Cherokee People. “We also feel like we are perfectly situated to facilitate other film projects and grow this industry right here in the Cherokee Nation. It’s an exciting time.”</p><br /> <p><span>Although Hollywood is still the film mecca of the world, states other than California have established themselves as film destinations. In recent years, major motion pictures and television series have been filmed in Texas, Georgia, Louisiana, and other states. The Motion Picture Association of America found in 2016* the Oklahoma film and television industry were responsible for 13,273 direct and indirect jobs and more than $220 million in wages. By contrast, Texas’ film and television industry were responsible for 105,525 jobs and $1.81 billion in wages. Georgia’s impacts were 92,494 jobs and $2.15 billion in wages, while Louisiana’s impacts were 22,707 jobs and nearly $400 million in wages. The Cherokee Nation Film Office’s partnerships with OF+MO and Tulsa FMAC will only enhance the attractiveness of Oklahoma’s budding film industry.</span></p><br /> <p><strong><span>“The launch of the Cherokee Nation Film Office supports our state’s mission to expand our footprint and become a top destination for film and music makers. With more strategic and authentic voices working alongside our state office, Oklahoma is poised to further educate global audiences on the truly unique landscapes, history, people and resources we can offer,” said Oklahoma Film + Music Office (OF+MO) Director Tava Maloy Sofsky. “We look forward to collaborating with the Cherokee Nation on many levels, as we collectively develop new talent and infrastructure.”</span></strong></p><br /> <p> </p><br /> <p>Cherokee Nation Businesses already has multiple economic development partnerships with the Tulsa Regional Chamber and Tulsa Regional Tourism, the parent organization of Tulsa FMAC. The goals of the Cherokee Nation Film Office naturally align with Tulsa FMAC’s mission and purpose.</p><br /> <p>“We’re thrilled that the Cherokee Nation is establishing a film office within their nation. As our mission has always been to highlight Tulsa and our region as a film destination, this development will further showcase what northeast Oklahoma has to offer. We look forward to collaborating with them and, together, continuing to grow a strong film industry that is sustainable for years to come,” said Abby Kurin, director of Tulsa FMAC.</p><br /> <p>Secretary of State Hoskin is the primary liaison between Cherokee Nation and the state of Oklahoma and began meetings months ago to help get the film office off the ground.</p><br /> <p>“This new partnership follows a familiar model but opens the door to exciting new opportunities for us,” Hoskin said. “When we work together and collaborate with our partners across the state, it helps Cherokees, but it also helps all Oklahomans by making our state a more attractive place to live, work and visit. I’m grateful we have talented Cherokee employees who are passionate about making this a successful new industry for the Cherokee Nation while further supporting our mission of preserving Cherokee culture.”</p><br /> <p>The Cherokee Nation Film Office has already begun collaborating with both OF+MO and Tulsa FMAC to promote Oklahoma to filmmakers and share with Oklahomans the important economic impacts of the entertainment industry. Keep up with the Cherokee Nation Film Office at cherokee.film, and visit its partner organizations at okfilmmusic.org and tulsafmac.com.</p><br /> <p> </p>Mon, 04 Feb 2019 0:00:00 CSTCherokee Nation Providing Grants to Support Education Tours in Springhttps://www.nativeknot.com/news/Cherokee-Nation-News/Cherokee-Nation-Providing-Grants-to-Support-Education-Tours-in-S.html<p style="text-align: center;"><strong><em>Teachers can apply now until -March 29</em></strong></p><br /> <p style="text-align: left;"> </p><br /> <div><br /> <p><strong>TULSA, Okla.<span> </span></strong>— Cherokee Nation is now accepting grant applications for its spring education tours. The sponsored tours provide an exclusive look at Cherokee Nation’s rich history and culture. Applications are accepted Feb. 1 - March 29.</p><br /> <p>Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism awards the grants in the spring and fall to elementary public schools within the tribe’s 14-county jurisdiction.</p><br /> <p>The complimentary curriculum is provided to schools that receive the grant and is available to teachers upon registration. The curriculum includes a teacher’s guide to preparing students for the education tour as well as a student activity.</p><br /> <p>The grant program offers three tour options:</p><br /> <p><strong>Cherokee History Tour —</strong> Visit Tahlequah’s historic Capitol Square and Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum, Cherokee National Prison Museum, Hunter’s Home, Cherokee Heritage Center and ancient Cherokee village, Diligwa.</p><br /> <p><strong>Will Rogers Tour —</strong> Visit the Will Rogers Memorial Museum and Dog Iron Ranch.</p><br /> <p><strong>Civil War Tour</strong> <strong>—</strong> Visit Tahlequah’s historic Capitol Square, Hunter’s Home, and Fort Gibson Historic Site.</p><br /> <p>Grants are available for grades third through sixth, and funding is provided on a first-come, first served basis.</p><br /> <p>Minimum requirements for eligibility for schools include being located within the Cherokee Nation’s 14-county jurisdiction, a majority of the school’s students must hold a Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood (C.D.I.B.) card, the school’s class size may not exceed tour capacity, and the majority of the school’s students must be eligible for free and/or reduced school lunches.</p><br /> <p>Schools that do not meet the requirements or miss the deadline may experience the program for a small fee. Special rates are available for seventh through 12th grade and college students.</p><br /> <p>Applications are accepted Feb. 1 through March 29 and are available at <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="http://link.email.dynect.net/link.php?DynEngagement=true&H=%2Bdu7sJaY23OO%2BqQ6mC2QqglzHYl8onDna9bYv0z8S%2B2c1yLWI1mxfo%2FUXIZbcQzbf98oCr3XsXnG0fQpMv1cIoEpUQEMtqVvZ%2B9W4CN9m4zD%2BCalKDb8Ak9kl6qPSrG3&G=0&R=http%3A%2F%2Fvisitcherokeenation.com%2FPages%2Fhome.aspx&I=20180130174506.0000005c9fda%40mail6-59-ussnn1&X=MHwxMDQ2NzU4OjVhNzBhMGU2ZDJjNzBmOTBmYzM5M2E3Yzs%3D&S=yViEWbIkBQeTn3EeIEogtfpQt0-CZTgaMUV9nyXClDY" target="_blank" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=http://link.email.dynect.net/link.php?DynEngagement%3Dtrue%26H%3D%252Bdu7sJaY23OO%252BqQ6mC2QqglzHYl8onDna9bYv0z8S%252B2c1yLWI1mxfo%252FUXIZbcQzbf98oCr3XsXnG0fQpMv1cIoEpUQEMtqVvZ%252B9W4CN9m4zD%252BCalKDb8Ak9kl6qPSrG3%26G%3D0%26R%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fvisitcherokeenation.com%252FPages%252Fhome.aspx%26I%3D20180130174506.0000005c9fda%2540mail6-59-ussnn1%26X%3DMHwxMDQ2NzU4OjVhNzBhMGU2ZDJjNzBmOTBmYzM5M2E3Yzs%253D%26S%3DyViEWbIkBQeTn3EeIEogtfpQt0-CZTgaMUV9nyXClDY&source=gmail&ust=1549379278633000&usg=AFQjCNGV2nHK9ViyYROgdh2_uzox6c110A">www.VisitCherokeeNation.com</a>.</p><br /> <p>For more information or to book an education tour, please call (918) 384-5930.</p><br /> </div>Mon, 04 Feb 2019 0:00:00 CST